Montario Quarter

Time to relax at Montario Quarter

Welcome to Montario Quarter.  Located on the former Shenton Park Rehabilitation Hospital, this site is set to become a premium residential, commercial and retail precinct providing amenities for the whole community to enjoy. 

Work will soon start, transforming the site into a modern development which integrates the natural environment with high quality built-form and community spaces. 

See the vision take shape

Montario Quarter will offer the next evolution of inner city living, creating an urban village within a landscape setting which integrates with the existing leafy green character of Shenton Park. 

The development will provide more than 1,100 dwellings to help meet demand from Perth's growing population.  This will include different housing types to suit a variety of lifestyles, as well as space for commercial, grocery and retail. 

Access will be simple for residents and visitors alike.  The Shenton Park train station is just a few minutes' walk away, and buses stop regularly along Selby Street, transporting passengers directly to major shopping centres, hospitals and universities throughout Perth. 

More than 25% of the site will be public open space offering places for both recreation and reflection, including retained bushland, walking trails, a nature-play area, urban orchard and exercise and playground equipment.  These concepts are important aspects of community health and wellness and are embraced throughout in the landscape design.

Residents will have everything at their fingertips, within their own private sanctuary

The legacy of Shenton Park

From its humble beginnings in 1893 through to its closure in 2014, the Shenton Park Rehabilitation Hospital touched the lives of thousands of patients, nurses, doctors and visitors. 

The hospital originated with a few tents in the bush as a way to isolate patients affected by smallpox.  Due to its remote location at the time, the hospital was ideal for this purpose and soon developed into a dedicated facility for patients requiring isolation.  

The hospital expanded in the 1930s with the addition of several new buildings including Victoria House, which is still standing today. 

The late 1940s saw the first orthopaedic patients treated at the hospital, followed shortly by the formation of a dedicated Paraplegic Unit founded by Sir George Montario Bedbrook.  This unit became well-known for the treatment and rehabilitation of patients with paraplegia, with a number of revolutionary techniques developed here under Sir George's leadership. 

In 1962, Royal Perth Hospital and the Shenton Park Paraplegic Unit sponsored the first ever Commonwealth Paraplegic Games in Perth. 

Over the following years, the Shenton Park Hospital further established itself as leader in rehabilitation services, introducing specialist neurology, speech pathology and occupational therapy departments.  These efforts became internationally recognised when the hospital was awarded the Belle Greive Memorial Award for the most significant contribution to rehabilitation. 

The hospital closed its doors in October 2014 and relocated its services to the Fiona Stanley Hospital in Murdoch.  Even though the hospital has closed, the memories, medical achievements and dedication of the staff lives on in its legacy. 

Behind the name

'Montario Quarter' has been named after a prominent figure in the history of Shenton Park Hospital and a pioneer in the treatment and rehabilitation of patients with paraplegia. 

Sir George Montario Bedbrook (1921-1991) was a leading orthopaedic surgeon who was instrumental in the establishment of the Shenton Park Hospital's paraplegic unit in 1954, which went on to become internationally reknowned for the quality of treatment provided to its patients.  

Sir George was also a strong advocate for the inclusion of people with paraplegia in sports, and led the organisation of the world's first Commonwealth Paraplegic Games in Perth. 

The name 'Montario Quarter' has been selected in recognition of Sir George's lifetime of service and the significant contribution he made to the treatment of patients with paraplegia.